Wednesday, March 3, 2021

51 percent of Americans would refuse or delay COVID vaccine, survey finds

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More than half of Americans say they would still either refuse or delay getting a COVID-19 vaccine, a new survey shows.

While the number of US residents who want the immunization has crept up since December, 51 percent remain either hesitant or downright opposed to getting their shots, according to the poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Of that defiant group, 31 percent say they want to see further results about the vaccine’s effectiveness and side effects before making up their minds, 13 percent are refusing to take it, and another 7 percent claim they only will if required.

“Those who have not yet been vaccinated for COVID-19 have many concerns and information needs related to the new vaccines,’’ the pollsters said in a release.

“About half say they don’t have enough information about the vaccine’s side effects or effectiveness.’’

Younger, black and Hispanic adults are especially wary about the lack of information, although there have been some gains in the number in those groups wanting to get immunized since last month, the poll says.

Meanwhile, 41 percent of Americans say they want to get vaccinated as soon as possible, an increase of 7 percent over December, the study shows.

Six percent of the respondents had already been immunized by the time the poll was conducted in January.

US residents living in rural communities and identifying as Republicans remain among the most hesitant in getting the shot, the survey found.

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